Dr Mungherera has been suffering the agony of the poverty of the medical fraternity that is in Uganda: 

February 8, 2017

Written by BAMUTURAKI MUSINGUZI

Dr Margaret Mungherera, the former president of the World Medical Association, died of cancer last week. As a tribute to one of the world's most respected and outspoken health rights activists, we republish this feature about Mungherera by BAMUTURAKI MUSINGUZI first published by The Observer in January 2014.


When Ugandan psychiatrist Margaret Mungherera was voted unopposed as president-elect of the prestigious World Medical Association (WMA) – the event conjured up bitter memories when she was refused to practice medicine in Britain 28 years ago.

Mungherera had travelled to the UK to pursue a diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene at the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in 1984, after completing her internship at Mulago hospital a year before.

In 1980 the General Medical Council in the UK had banned doctors from a number of countries, Uganda inclusive, from working in England for various reasons, including the insecurity in Uganda then, and an alleged decline in standards here. Hence while Mungherera’s classmates from India, Nigeria and Ghana were allowed to practice, Ugandans were rejected as unworthy.

“For us personally as doctors we felt sort of downgraded and humiliated. It meant that if you could not work in England, then you could not work in Germany, France or Europe,” Mungherera says.

She recalls that even when they were admitted, they were told they could not touch patients, meaning that it was going to be a theoretical course.

“It was OK that we were not allowed into courses that were clinical at the time. It must have been up until the 1990s when we struggled and we were recognized again.”


Mungherera’s highest personal recognition came in October 2012, when she was voted WMA president-elect for 2013-2014 at the association’s annual General Assembly in Bangkok, Thailand. A year later, in Fortaleza, Brazil, she was installed as president at the WMA general assembly.

WMA, acting on behalf of patients and physicians, endeavours to achieve the highest possible standards of medical care, ethics, education and health-related human rights for all people.

“When I was taking up this post, the people who actually looked for me were from the British Medical Association. I also had doctors from the American, German and South African Medical Associations who actually rallied and convinced me to take up this challenge. And so when I was declared unopposed at the meeting in Bangkok last year, the first thing that came into my mind was how I felt that afternoon when I was not allowed to register in the UK,” Mungherera says, remarking what a “wonderful thing” it is that the British now think a Ugandan can lead.

Mungherera is only the third woman to head the 66-year-old association, after Dr P. Kincaid-Smith from Australia (1994-5) and Dr Kati Myllymaki from Finland (2002-3). And she is the second African president, after South Africa’s Bernard Mandell (1996-7). She sees this as more evidence to a gender-imbalanced world – that women can ably lead.

“As president, I am going to be the ambassador of the association. I will be the mouthpiece and spokesperson. I will represent WMA at the United Nations and World Health Organisation meetings and other bodies that have a relationship with the association. I will also be visiting national member associations especially where health workers have challenges. If, for example, they have unfairly detained a health worker or where rights of health workers are being violated,” she says.

Mungherera has been a medical doctor for over 30 years and a psychiatrist for 20 years. She specializes in forensic psychiatry at Mulago teaching and referral hospital. She also has responsibilities as the clinical head, directorate of Medical Services (departments of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry). In addition, she is a senior consultant psychiatrist at Mulago hospital, in charge of psychiatry emergency services.

Mungherera is a founding member of the Association of Uganda Women Medical Doctors and was the first woman to be elected honorary president of the Uganda Medical Association (UMA) since its formation in 1963. She is also its longest-serving president – 1998-2005 and again from 2010 to-date. As WMA boss, she hopes to tackle the challenges of delivering quality healthcare to millions around the world. And she articulates the problem clearly.

“I think the main challenge is that there is a human resource crisis all over the world whether you are talking about high, middle or low-income countries. The most affected areas are the low and middle-income countries. In terms of migration there is a lot of internal and external migration. People are migrating from the South to the North. People are even migrating within their countries from rural to urban areas. So, there is a lot of inequality in terms of distribution of health workers,” she says.

“I also think that the profession has low numbers but also there is a shortage of skills. The skills that are necessary now are to do with the new diseases that have emerged. For example, we as doctors should no longer keep sitting in our clinics; we should be out there doing advocacy, public awareness and health promotions.

“The diseases have changed; we should be talking about lifestyle, more than infections. [Of] course infections are important but lifestyle is a very important issue now. The other challenge as new diseases and epidemics emerge, there is reduced resources for health care. In most countries health care resources are going down,” she added.



Dr Mungherera supervising work at Mulago hospital in 2014

To address these challenges, Mungherera suggests that governments should show more commitment and increase funding for the sector. And the private sector, too, should be more involved in providing solutions.

“For example, a lot of governments have signed the Abuja Declaration, which requires all countries to allocate at least 15 per cent of their national budgets to health. It is not happening in any of the low-income countries and even some middle income countries.”

Mungherera also stresses that research has to be the pillar of efficient healthcare systems.

“We need to be providing services that are based on evidence. So, in many of these countries there is very little money for research. And a lot of research is done by institutions elsewhere. A lot of research is not being translated into policy and action; so, there is a lot of wastage of resources for research. We need to get more money but also target the money to where it is needed to influence policy and action.”


UP TO THE TASK

According the former WMA president, Dr Cecil Wilson, there is no doubt Mungherera will make a great president.

“In talking with Dr Mungherera about her vision for the WMA, what comes through loud and clear is a dedication to bringing the disparate member organisations of the WMA together,” Wilson wrote in his blog posted on the WMA website.

The principal medical officer in charge of mental health at the Ugandan ministry of Health, Dr Sheila Ndyanabangi, describes Mungherera as a charismatic, driven, outspoken, and truly emancipated woman.

“She has fought for the medical profession and the rights for women, men, children and health workers. She was a pioneer in starting health services for after-rape victims,” Ndyanabangi told The Observer. “Therefore, I think she has a lot to offer in coming up with new approaches in empowering health workers in general but also the medical doctors to fulfill their potential in as far as they can contribute to the wellbeing of the population.”

A particular area of concern for Mungherera is the delivery of psychiatric services in Africa, which are hindered by challenges such as the stigma associated with mental illness.

“Stigma also leads to limited resources provided by families, communities and governments. And our services are still rudimentary if you compare them with those in the West. We need to do more work with traditional healers because we know they have a role to play. We need [to] train, educate, and reorient them on what our different roles should be.”

“We need to educate the masses about the common causes of mental illness and how they can recognize mental problems. We also need to integrate mental care into primary healthcare so that every health worker can recognize the form of condition and to give some sort of treatment and know when and where to refer.”

Mungherera notes that immunization is not the responsibility of the health sector only but a multi-sectoral issue that calls for adequate funds for social mobilization.

“If we do not put enough money and effort in social mobilization, we are not going to get the results we want as far as immunization is concerned.”

Mungherera observes that the medical sector in East Africa is developing with the input from the private sector but more resources are required to gain higher growth.

“Things would move faster if we had more resources and especially the human resource. However, in the last 20 years a lot has changed in the way we manage and prevent diseases, and the number of skilled professions has increased. With more resources we can actually get where we can say it is of good standard,” she adds.

Mungherera has expertise in training health professionals and community health workers (CHWs), mental health and forensic medicine research, human rights advocacy, non-profit organizational governance and development.

In 2000, Mungherera initiated discussions between national medical associations in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, a move that culminated in the formation of the Federation of East African Medical and Dental Associations.

A significant achievement of the federation has been to bring together for the first time national medical associations to work with their regulatory bodies in the Eastern African region (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and later Rwanda and Burundi) to strategise and plan for a joint effort to promote standards in training of doctors, regulation, continuing professional development, cross-border disease surveillance and emergency response.

President Yoweri Museveni appointed Mungherera a member of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into the Global Fund for HIV/Aids, TB and Malaria (2004-2005) and member, Public Universities Visitation Committee (2005-2006).

Mungherera, who was born on October 25, 1957, has five siblings, including four medical doctors. She is married to Richard Mushanga, a retired banker, and she has an adult step-son and four grandaughters.


Nb


Of late these are the modern African medical professionals who seem to have suffered the fool concerning the self inflicted poverty of the country of Uganda. The country of Uganda cannot be struggling to own and use only one cancer treatment machine out of about 50 modern British style hospitals flourishing nationwide. It is a disgrace.


A MEDICAL LETTER FOR AMAMA MBABAZI

January 6, 2017

Written by MOSES KHISA

Mr Amama Mbabazzi


Dear Ndugu Amama,

Greetings! I had hoped to speak with you in Kampala just before Christmas day, but the vicissitudes of life and the messiness of our city made it a little difficult. Before long, I was back to base in Chicago.

One of your aides intimated that you had recently asked about me. And coincidentally, one of the ardent readers of this column, Samuel, not too long ago wanted to know if I knew what you are up to lately. I promised him I would put the question to you directly. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to.

Meanwhile, I was meaning to write you a line on the email when news broke through with a bang: you are in talks with Uganda’s chief fighter, Ssabalwanyi General Museveni, through your daughter Rachel.

Rachel came very close to fully confirming this development, telling the Daily Monitor newspaper: “Yes, I have met the president on several occasions. However, it is bad manners to disclose what one discusses with one’s elders.”

This news has attracted indignation, at least on social media.







The two brothers running the affairs of the country of Uganda.


Ugandans who are sick and tired of Museveni’s decadent rule are resolutely hostile to any rationale for meeting with and talking to a man you so diligently served.

I have a different view, though. The issue shouldn’t be about meeting or not meeting, it’s about why you have to meet and talk. You sure should meet Mr Museveni and speak to him candidly.

I don’t wish to sound presumptuous, but if you may permit me, I should like to remind you something you know all too well. Museveni has a knack for humiliating those who oppose him, chiding anyone who disagrees with him, discrediting and assaulting whoever threatens his grip on power.










NRM swimming in cash money.


I suspect that you are a man who prides in his honour and integrity. The last thing you want to do is crawl back to the Ssabalwanyi begging for favours and access to state largesse. The late Eriya Kategaya went through that ignominy and must have died a depressed man.

At any rate, you should savour a meeting with Museveni and tell him more forcefully what you have told him in the past: that his time is up. Tell him it is in his best interest to work out an exit plan before it becomes inevitable to depart disgracefully. Impress upon him not to wait for 2021 because he should have already left, anyway.

Tell him that harkening back to the Constitution is hollow. The Constitution was long abrogated, otherwise, we wouldn’t have flagrant disregard of court decisions, abuse of court processes, and illegal use of force especially at the behest of a partisan head of the Uganda Police Force. So, there is no constitutional order to talk about.

As you know, with your explicit involvement and enthusiastic participation, the infant 1995 Constitution received a severe knockdown in 2005. It was damned beyond redemption. The country will need a new Constitution once the current system is set aside, one way or the other, in the near future.

That said, Ndugu, I should like to propose that you use the opportunity of meeting your old comrade to persuade him that he is out of touch with the real problems of Uganda. He needs to clear the way and create the space for a new leadership that can reimagine a new Uganda and forge a better future.

The illusion that it is him to save our country and the mass of our compatriots from intractable socioeconomic and political problems has driven the country to a cliffhanger. The insecurity borne of a dubious long stay in power has bred blatant nepotism and a bloated personal security apparatus, weighing heavily on the national budget.

Remind General Museveni that the longer he has clung on, the more he has set up the country for a dangerous end to his rule, something that seems to have attracted disquiet from right inside his family environs, if the ramblings of one of his sons-in-law is to be taken at face value.

The writing is right on the wall. Remind him that there are many historical lessons to look to if at all he is in doubt as to how the course of history can sometimes unfold following its own laws and in total disregard of human ingenuity and logic.

Uganda is not at all inoculated against the kinds of tragic events we have seen in other countries where rulers cling onto power, effectively undermining and undoing whatever progress in place and leaving behind ruins when finally forced out.

I understand that General Museveni is not particularly keen on taking advice, never mind the over 100 advisors. But if you can impress upon him the urgency of his exit from power, you will have done a great service to the nation, arguably more important than what you did as a government official for three decades.

The next time I am in town, I will be sure to seek you out about receipt of, and reaction to, this letter. I hope you will still be holding your own in opposing life presidency and family rule in Uganda.

I thank you!

moses.khisa@

gmail.com

The author teaches  political science at Northwestern University/Evanston, Chicago-USA.


Nb


The message this writer is making has already been made through  the recent expansive General Election of 2016. Mr Mbabazi has a very sick wife and with the advice of his strong daughters, there is not enough money in the family to treat their mother of cancer all over the world's medical hospitals.

Embeera y’eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo y’eraga Banna

yuganda bwe batafa ku byabwe

May 31, 2014

Eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo bwe lifaanana.


Broken Down Ambulance



Dodgy mud and wattle

Latrine in Jinja City

Broken down bathroom

Mu 2012, abayimbi

ba Ganda Boys okuli Dennis Mugagga ne Daniel Ssewagudde baatonera eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo ebikozesebwa ebibalirirwamu doola 15,000. Bazzeemu okukola ekintu kye kimu bwe bawadde eddaaliro lino ekyuma ekibikka abaana, kompyuta n’okulirongoosa, wamu n’okutonera essomero lya Lugazi Community Primary kompyuta. John Weeraga yasisinkanye Dennis Mugagga n’ayogera ku bukulu bwa Bannayuganda okwagala ebyabwe.

Mmwe musobodde mutya okusigalawo wadde mweyubula okuva ku Da Twinz okudda ku Ganda Boys?

Twatendekebwa bulungi. E Namasagali twalina Fr. Grimes eyatuwa entandikwa, n’atulaga vizoni ennyimba zaffe kwe zisobola okuvuganyiza e Bulaaya naddala mu by’okuzina n’okukuba ebivuga.

Twatuuka ekiseera ne tumanya nti tusaanye okweyubula, singa twakomawo nga Da Twinz, wano wanditumize.

Naye twamanya kye tuli, myuziki wa Uganda ky’ali ne kye tuyinza okuguza Abazungu. Jjuuzi twabadde ku siteegi ne bakafulu mu kuyimba nga 65 ku siteegi y’emu, nga bo batukubira ebivuga (orchestrar) ng’eno bwe tuyimba. Bo Bazungu ffe tuli Bannayuganda!

Bonna baabadde n’obuyigirize obusinga ku bwadokita. Naye ggwe bw’oba n’obukkakkamu, n’okkiriza ky’oli. N’omanya nti bo balina kye bamanyi, naye naawe by’oyimba tebabimanyi olwo ojja kumalako.

Ffe ne tuyimba ‘Agawalaggana mu nkoola’, nabo ne bakuba ebivuga byabwe okusinziira ku bwe tuyimba, ne tuzina, abawagizi ne banyumirwa oluyimba! Kino abayimbi ba Uganda kye batannayiga, baagala kufaanana nga Bazungu sso ng’ebyabwe tebabisobola.

Naye ebibiina ebimu nga Eagles bisasika?

ABO baali basobola okukwatagana ne beeyubula, ne bafuna abawagizi abaggya ebweru ne mu Uganda.

Eno ye ambyulensi y’eddwaaliro.

Bandizuddewo engeri y’okumanya muyimbi ki mu bo akaddiye, bayinza kumuggyawo oba kumuyubula batya ne bayingizaawo n’abaana abato? Abazungu bakikola nnyo, oyo akaddiye talwana na mwana muto ng’ayiiya ennyimba ezijja okubaswaza wabula asigala ayimba ennyimba ze n’abato ne bayimba ezaabwe.

Singa aba Eagles baatuukirira Moses Matovu owa Afrigo oba abantu abalala abaludde mu nsiike eno bandibadde babawabula.

Kiki kye mufunye mu kweyubula kwe mukoze?

Kye nsinze okusanyukira kwe kuba nti bwe tuyimba, oli n’asituka n’agamba nti nze eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo ndiwadde ekyuma kino, ndiwadde kompyuta abasawo basobole okuwuliziganya ne bannaabwe e Bulaaya. Kino nze kimmala, kubanga n’ebintu bye tuyimba ebisinga si byaffe.

Mwasinziira ku ki okulonda eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo okuliwa obuyambi?

Eddwaaliro bbi nnyo, liri ku luguudo lunene okubeera obubenje buli kiseera naye tebalina bitanda, amazzi tebalina, lirina ebizibu bingi.

Naye mwanamugimu ava ku ngozi, kitange Dr. Charles L. Mugagga yakulirako eddwaaliro lino okumala ebbanga mu myaka gya 1980, ate maama Sr. Alice Mugagga naye yakulirako ekitongole ky’abakazi abazaala mu ddwaaliro lino ate nga nange nnalirabako nga likola.

Condoms block Masaka munici
pality sewerage plant

Publish Date: Feb 21, 2015

By Francis Emorut
 
Sewerage pipes that are always blocked by condoms at the Masaka sewerage plant.  


MASAKA,BUGANDA, UGANDA -

Condoms flushed from the toilets of lodges in Masaka town and also dumped in the sewerage plant threaten the municipality's sewerage system functioning.


The National Water Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) sewerage plant that was built in 1952 has been intruded by town dwellers who dump condoms and polythene bags into it.


"The condoms and dead animals like dogs and cats and are being dumped into the sewerage plant and they cause blockage, making workers to constantly unblock the manholes," Joseph Mugenyi the area manager NWSC Masaka told MPs of Parliamentary Forum on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and officials from Uganda Water Network (UWASNET) on Friday.


The group of legislators was on a field tour to assess the implementation of WASH programme in the district.


Mugenyi said his workers have a mighty task to prevent the municipality from being enveloped in filth if the sewerage overflows.


"The workers keep monitoring and unblocking the manhole whenever they have been blocked by condoms to prevent the sewerage from overflowing. Otherwise, the whole town would be full of stench," he said.


The water area manager said plans are underway to fence the sewerage plant to prevent residents of the town from dumping waste into it.



A team of MPs inspected the plant on Friday. 

Workers always unblock the sewerage pipes. 


The sewerage plant was built 63 years ago. 

Condoms and dead animals are usually dumped in the sewerage plant. (Photo credit: Francis Emorut)

The vice chairperson of the Parliamentary Forum on WASH Ephraim Biraaro emphasized the need to sensitize the municipal dwellers on the dangers of flushing condoms into their toilet systems or dumping them in the sewerage plant.


He appealed to the district leaders to sensitize the masses on the proper way of condom disposal.


Biraaro also called for the implementation of the polythene bag law which banned its manufacture.


Ngora Woman MP Jacline Amongin, who is also the chairperson of Parliamentary Forum on WASH, called for more funding for water, sanitation and hygiene.


She asked the district authorities to prioritise sanitation and hygiene.


The MPs were also shown new technologies of water source and harvesting in Kalungu.


Lawmaker Hatwib Katoto warned that if the district authorities don't take action the municipality would experience an outbreak of cholera.


The Oil rich African country of Nigeria has started to borrow money to pay salaries as Interna

tional price of oil tumbles

By Agencies

Posted  Thursday, May 7  2015

 

NIGERIA, Lagos A cash shortage caused by low oil prices has forced Nigeria to borrow heavily through the early part of 2015, with the government struggling to pay public workers, officials said yesterday.

“We have serious challenges. Things have been tough since the beginning of the year and they are likely to remain so till the end of the year,” said Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala.

Nigeria, Africa’s top economy and largest oil producer, has been hammered by the 50 per cent fall in oil prices, with crude sales accounting for more than 70 per cent of government revenue.

“As it stands today, most states of the federation have not been able to pay salaries and even the federal government has not paid (April) salary and that is very worrisome,” said Imo state governor Rochas Okorocha.

Nb

It seems that Third World countries have a long way to learn how to handle their economies with a bit of caution. It is bad indeed to put ones  eggs in one basket.

Dr Mungherera has been suffering the agony of the poverty of the medical fraternity that is in Uganda: 

February 8, 2017

Written by BAMUTURAKI MUSINGUZI

Dr Margaret Mungherera, the former president of the World Medical Association, died of cancer last week. As a tribute to one of the world's most respected and outspoken health rights activists, we republish this feature about Mungherera by BAMUTURAKI MUSINGUZI first published by The Observer in January 2014.


When Ugandan psychiatrist Margaret Mungherera was voted unopposed as president-elect of the prestigious World Medical Association (WMA) – the event conjured up bitter memories when she was refused to practice medicine in Britain 28 years ago.

Mungherera had travelled to the UK to pursue a diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene at the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in 1984, after completing her internship at Mulago hospital a year before.

In 1980 the General Medical Council in the UK had banned doctors from a number of countries, Uganda inclusive, from working in England for various reasons, including the insecurity in Uganda then, and an alleged decline in standards here. Hence while Mungherera’s classmates from India, Nigeria and Ghana were allowed to practice, Ugandans were rejected as unworthy.

“For us personally as doctors we felt sort of downgraded and humiliated. It meant that if you could not work in England, then you could not work in Germany, France or Europe,” Mungherera says.

She recalls that even when they were admitted, they were told they could not touch patients, meaning that it was going to be a theoretical course.

“It was OK that we were not allowed into courses that were clinical at the time. It must have been up until the 1990s when we struggled and we were recognized again.”


Mungherera’s highest personal recognition came in October 2012, when she was voted WMA president-elect for 2013-2014 at the association’s annual General Assembly in Bangkok, Thailand. A year later, in Fortaleza, Brazil, she was installed as president at the WMA general assembly.

WMA, acting on behalf of patients and physicians, endeavours to achieve the highest possible standards of medical care, ethics, education and health-related human rights for all people.

“When I was taking up this post, the people who actually looked for me were from the British Medical Association. I also had doctors from the American, German and South African Medical Associations who actually rallied and convinced me to take up this challenge. And so when I was declared unopposed at the meeting in Bangkok last year, the first thing that came into my mind was how I felt that afternoon when I was not allowed to register in the UK,” Mungherera says, remarking what a “wonderful thing” it is that the British now think a Ugandan can lead.

Mungherera is only the third woman to head the 66-year-old association, after Dr P. Kincaid-Smith from Australia (1994-5) and Dr Kati Myllymaki from Finland (2002-3). And she is the second African president, after South Africa’s Bernard Mandell (1996-7). She sees this as more evidence to a gender-imbalanced world – that women can ably lead.

“As president, I am going to be the ambassador of the association. I will be the mouthpiece and spokesperson. I will represent WMA at the United Nations and World Health Organisation meetings and other bodies that have a relationship with the association. I will also be visiting national member associations especially where health workers have challenges. If, for example, they have unfairly detained a health worker or where rights of health workers are being violated,” she says.

Mungherera has been a medical doctor for over 30 years and a psychiatrist for 20 years. She specializes in forensic psychiatry at Mulago teaching and referral hospital. She also has responsibilities as the clinical head, directorate of Medical Services (departments of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry). In addition, she is a senior consultant psychiatrist at Mulago hospital, in charge of psychiatry emergency services.

Mungherera is a founding member of the Association of Uganda Women Medical Doctors and was the first woman to be elected honorary president of the Uganda Medical Association (UMA) since its formation in 1963. She is also its longest-serving president – 1998-2005 and again from 2010 to-date. As WMA boss, she hopes to tackle the challenges of delivering quality healthcare to millions around the world. And she articulates the problem clearly.

“I think the main challenge is that there is a human resource crisis all over the world whether you are talking about high, middle or low-income countries. The most affected areas are the low and middle-income countries. In terms of migration there is a lot of internal and external migration. People are migrating from the South to the North. People are even migrating within their countries from rural to urban areas. So, there is a lot of inequality in terms of distribution of health workers,” she says.

“I also think that the profession has low numbers but also there is a shortage of skills. The skills that are necessary now are to do with the new diseases that have emerged. For example, we as doctors should no longer keep sitting in our clinics; we should be out there doing advocacy, public awareness and health promotions.

“The diseases have changed; we should be talking about lifestyle, more than infections. [Of] course infections are important but lifestyle is a very important issue now. The other challenge as new diseases and epidemics emerge, there is reduced resources for health care. In most countries health care resources are going down,” she added.



Dr Mungherera supervising work at Mulago hospital in 2014

To address these challenges, Mungherera suggests that governments should show more commitment and increase funding for the sector. And the private sector, too, should be more involved in providing solutions.

“For example, a lot of governments have signed the Abuja Declaration, which requires all countries to allocate at least 15 per cent of their national budgets to health. It is not happening in any of the low-income countries and even some middle income countries.”

Mungherera also stresses that research has to be the pillar of efficient healthcare systems.

“We need to be providing services that are based on evidence. So, in many of these countries there is very little money for research. And a lot of research is done by institutions elsewhere. A lot of research is not being translated into policy and action; so, there is a lot of wastage of resources for research. We need to get more money but also target the money to where it is needed to influence policy and action.”


UP TO THE TASK

According the former WMA president, Dr Cecil Wilson, there is no doubt Mungherera will make a great president.

“In talking with Dr Mungherera about her vision for the WMA, what comes through loud and clear is a dedication to bringing the disparate member organisations of the WMA together,” Wilson wrote in his blog posted on the WMA website.

The principal medical officer in charge of mental health at the Ugandan ministry of Health, Dr Sheila Ndyanabangi, describes Mungherera as a charismatic, driven, outspoken, and truly emancipated woman.

“She has fought for the medical profession and the rights for women, men, children and health workers. She was a pioneer in starting health services for after-rape victims,” Ndyanabangi told The Observer. “Therefore, I think she has a lot to offer in coming up with new approaches in empowering health workers in general but also the medical doctors to fulfill their potential in as far as they can contribute to the wellbeing of the population.”

A particular area of concern for Mungherera is the delivery of psychiatric services in Africa, which are hindered by challenges such as the stigma associated with mental illness.

“Stigma also leads to limited resources provided by families, communities and governments. And our services are still rudimentary if you compare them with those in the West. We need to do more work with traditional healers because we know they have a role to play. We need [to] train, educate, and reorient them on what our different roles should be.”

“We need to educate the masses about the common causes of mental illness and how they can recognize mental problems. We also need to integrate mental care into primary healthcare so that every health worker can recognize the form of condition and to give some sort of treatment and know when and where to refer.”

Mungherera notes that immunization is not the responsibility of the health sector only but a multi-sectoral issue that calls for adequate funds for social mobilization.

“If we do not put enough money and effort in social mobilization, we are not going to get the results we want as far as immunization is concerned.”

Mungherera observes that the medical sector in East Africa is developing with the input from the private sector but more resources are required to gain higher growth.

“Things would move faster if we had more resources and especially the human resource. However, in the last 20 years a lot has changed in the way we manage and prevent diseases, and the number of skilled professions has increased. With more resources we can actually get where we can say it is of good standard,” she adds.

Mungherera has expertise in training health professionals and community health workers (CHWs), mental health and forensic medicine research, human rights advocacy, non-profit organizational governance and development.

In 2000, Mungherera initiated discussions between national medical associations in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, a move that culminated in the formation of the Federation of East African Medical and Dental Associations.

A significant achievement of the federation has been to bring together for the first time national medical associations to work with their regulatory bodies in the Eastern African region (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and later Rwanda and Burundi) to strategise and plan for a joint effort to promote standards in training of doctors, regulation, continuing professional development, cross-border disease surveillance and emergency response.

President Yoweri Museveni appointed Mungherera a member of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into the Global Fund for HIV/Aids, TB and Malaria (2004-2005) and member, Public Universities Visitation Committee (2005-2006).

Mungherera, who was born on October 25, 1957, has five siblings, including four medical doctors. She is married to Richard Mushanga, a retired banker, and she has an adult step-son and four grandaughters.


Nb


Of late these are the modern African medical professionals who seem to have suffered the fool concerning the self inflicted poverty of the country of Uganda. The country of Uganda cannot be struggling to own and use only one cancer treatment machine out of about 50 modern British style hospitals flourishing nationwide. It is a disgrace.


A MEDICAL LETTER FOR AMAMA MBABAZI

January 6, 2017

Written by MOSES KHISA

Mr Amama Mbabazzi


Dear Ndugu Amama,

Greetings! I had hoped to speak with you in Kampala just before Christmas day, but the vicissitudes of life and the messiness of our city made it a little difficult. Before long, I was back to base in Chicago.

One of your aides intimated that you had recently asked about me. And coincidentally, one of the ardent readers of this column, Samuel, not too long ago wanted to know if I knew what you are up to lately. I promised him I would put the question to you directly. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to.

Meanwhile, I was meaning to write you a line on the email when news broke through with a bang: you are in talks with Uganda’s chief fighter, Ssabalwanyi General Museveni, through your daughter Rachel.

Rachel came very close to fully confirming this development, telling the Daily Monitor newspaper: “Yes, I have met the president on several occasions. However, it is bad manners to disclose what one discusses with one’s elders.”

This news has attracted indignation, at least on social media.







The two brothers running the affairs of the country of Uganda.


Ugandans who are sick and tired of Museveni’s decadent rule are resolutely hostile to any rationale for meeting with and talking to a man you so diligently served.

I have a different view, though. The issue shouldn’t be about meeting or not meeting, it’s about why you have to meet and talk. You sure should meet Mr Museveni and speak to him candidly.

I don’t wish to sound presumptuous, but if you may permit me, I should like to remind you something you know all too well. Museveni has a knack for humiliating those who oppose him, chiding anyone who disagrees with him, discrediting and assaulting whoever threatens his grip on power.










NRM swimming in cash money.


I suspect that you are a man who prides in his honour and integrity. The last thing you want to do is crawl back to the Ssabalwanyi begging for favours and access to state largesse. The late Eriya Kategaya went through that ignominy and must have died a depressed man.

At any rate, you should savour a meeting with Museveni and tell him more forcefully what you have told him in the past: that his time is up. Tell him it is in his best interest to work out an exit plan before it becomes inevitable to depart disgracefully. Impress upon him not to wait for 2021 because he should have already left, anyway.

Tell him that harkening back to the Constitution is hollow. The Constitution was long abrogated, otherwise, we wouldn’t have flagrant disregard of court decisions, abuse of court processes, and illegal use of force especially at the behest of a partisan head of the Uganda Police Force. So, there is no constitutional order to talk about.

As you know, with your explicit involvement and enthusiastic participation, the infant 1995 Constitution received a severe knockdown in 2005. It was damned beyond redemption. The country will need a new Constitution once the current system is set aside, one way or the other, in the near future.

That said, Ndugu, I should like to propose that you use the opportunity of meeting your old comrade to persuade him that he is out of touch with the real problems of Uganda. He needs to clear the way and create the space for a new leadership that can reimagine a new Uganda and forge a better future.

The illusion that it is him to save our country and the mass of our compatriots from intractable socioeconomic and political problems has driven the country to a cliffhanger. The insecurity borne of a dubious long stay in power has bred blatant nepotism and a bloated personal security apparatus, weighing heavily on the national budget.

Remind General Museveni that the longer he has clung on, the more he has set up the country for a dangerous end to his rule, something that seems to have attracted disquiet from right inside his family environs, if the ramblings of one of his sons-in-law is to be taken at face value.

The writing is right on the wall. Remind him that there are many historical lessons to look to if at all he is in doubt as to how the course of history can sometimes unfold following its own laws and in total disregard of human ingenuity and logic.

Uganda is not at all inoculated against the kinds of tragic events we have seen in other countries where rulers cling onto power, effectively undermining and undoing whatever progress in place and leaving behind ruins when finally forced out.

I understand that General Museveni is not particularly keen on taking advice, never mind the over 100 advisors. But if you can impress upon him the urgency of his exit from power, you will have done a great service to the nation, arguably more important than what you did as a government official for three decades.

The next time I am in town, I will be sure to seek you out about receipt of, and reaction to, this letter. I hope you will still be holding your own in opposing life presidency and family rule in Uganda.

I thank you!

moses.khisa@

gmail.com

The author teaches  political science at Northwestern University/Evanston, Chicago-USA.


Nb


The message this writer is making has already been made through  the recent expansive General Election of 2016. Mr Mbabazi has a very sick wife and with the advice of his strong daughters, there is not enough money in the family to treat their mother of cancer all over the world's medical hospitals.

Embeera y’eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo y’eraga Banna

yuganda bwe batafa ku byabwe

May 31, 2014

Eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo bwe lifaanana.


Broken Down Ambulance



Dodgy mud and wattle

Latrine in Jinja City

Broken down bathroom

Mu 2012, abayimbi

ba Ganda Boys okuli Dennis Mugagga ne Daniel Ssewagudde baatonera eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo ebikozesebwa ebibalirirwamu doola 15,000. Bazzeemu okukola ekintu kye kimu bwe bawadde eddaaliro lino ekyuma ekibikka abaana, kompyuta n’okulirongoosa, wamu n’okutonera essomero lya Lugazi Community Primary kompyuta. John Weeraga yasisinkanye Dennis Mugagga n’ayogera ku bukulu bwa Bannayuganda okwagala ebyabwe.

Mmwe musobodde mutya okusigalawo wadde mweyubula okuva ku Da Twinz okudda ku Ganda Boys?

Twatendekebwa bulungi. E Namasagali twalina Fr. Grimes eyatuwa entandikwa, n’atulaga vizoni ennyimba zaffe kwe zisobola okuvuganyiza e Bulaaya naddala mu by’okuzina n’okukuba ebivuga.

Twatuuka ekiseera ne tumanya nti tusaanye okweyubula, singa twakomawo nga Da Twinz, wano wanditumize.

Naye twamanya kye tuli, myuziki wa Uganda ky’ali ne kye tuyinza okuguza Abazungu. Jjuuzi twabadde ku siteegi ne bakafulu mu kuyimba nga 65 ku siteegi y’emu, nga bo batukubira ebivuga (orchestrar) ng’eno bwe tuyimba. Bo Bazungu ffe tuli Bannayuganda!

Bonna baabadde n’obuyigirize obusinga ku bwadokita. Naye ggwe bw’oba n’obukkakkamu, n’okkiriza ky’oli. N’omanya nti bo balina kye bamanyi, naye naawe by’oyimba tebabimanyi olwo ojja kumalako.

Ffe ne tuyimba ‘Agawalaggana mu nkoola’, nabo ne bakuba ebivuga byabwe okusinziira ku bwe tuyimba, ne tuzina, abawagizi ne banyumirwa oluyimba! Kino abayimbi ba Uganda kye batannayiga, baagala kufaanana nga Bazungu sso ng’ebyabwe tebabisobola.

Naye ebibiina ebimu nga Eagles bisasika?

ABO baali basobola okukwatagana ne beeyubula, ne bafuna abawagizi abaggya ebweru ne mu Uganda.

Eno ye ambyulensi y’eddwaaliro.

Bandizuddewo engeri y’okumanya muyimbi ki mu bo akaddiye, bayinza kumuggyawo oba kumuyubula batya ne bayingizaawo n’abaana abato? Abazungu bakikola nnyo, oyo akaddiye talwana na mwana muto ng’ayiiya ennyimba ezijja okubaswaza wabula asigala ayimba ennyimba ze n’abato ne bayimba ezaabwe.

Singa aba Eagles baatuukirira Moses Matovu owa Afrigo oba abantu abalala abaludde mu nsiike eno bandibadde babawabula.

Kiki kye mufunye mu kweyubula kwe mukoze?

Kye nsinze okusanyukira kwe kuba nti bwe tuyimba, oli n’asituka n’agamba nti nze eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo ndiwadde ekyuma kino, ndiwadde kompyuta abasawo basobole okuwuliziganya ne bannaabwe e Bulaaya. Kino nze kimmala, kubanga n’ebintu bye tuyimba ebisinga si byaffe.

Mwasinziira ku ki okulonda eddwaaliro ly’e Kawolo okuliwa obuyambi?

Eddwaaliro bbi nnyo, liri ku luguudo lunene okubeera obubenje buli kiseera naye tebalina bitanda, amazzi tebalina, lirina ebizibu bingi.

Naye mwanamugimu ava ku ngozi, kitange Dr. Charles L. Mugagga yakulirako eddwaaliro lino okumala ebbanga mu myaka gya 1980, ate maama Sr. Alice Mugagga naye yakulirako ekitongole ky’abakazi abazaala mu ddwaaliro lino ate nga nange nnalirabako nga likola.

Condoms block Masaka munici
pality sewerage plant

Publish Date: Feb 21, 2015

By Francis Emorut
 
Sewerage pipes that are always blocked by condoms at the Masaka sewerage plant.  


MASAKA,BUGANDA, UGANDA -

Condoms flushed from the toilets of lodges in Masaka town and also dumped in the sewerage plant threaten the municipality's sewerage system functioning.


The National Water Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) sewerage plant that was built in 1952 has been intruded by town dwellers who dump condoms and polythene bags into it.


"The condoms and dead animals like dogs and cats and are being dumped into the sewerage plant and they cause blockage, making workers to constantly unblock the manholes," Joseph Mugenyi the area manager NWSC Masaka told MPs of Parliamentary Forum on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and officials from Uganda Water Network (UWASNET) on Friday.


The group of legislators was on a field tour to assess the implementation of WASH programme in the district.


Mugenyi said his workers have a mighty task to prevent the municipality from being enveloped in filth if the sewerage overflows.


"The workers keep monitoring and unblocking the manhole whenever they have been blocked by condoms to prevent the sewerage from overflowing. Otherwise, the whole town would be full of stench," he said.


The water area manager said plans are underway to fence the sewerage plant to prevent residents of the town from dumping waste into it.



A team of MPs inspected the plant on Friday. 

Workers always unblock the sewerage pipes. 


The sewerage plant was built 63 years ago. 

Condoms and dead animals are usually dumped in the sewerage plant. (Photo credit: Francis Emorut)

The vice chairperson of the Parliamentary Forum on WASH Ephraim Biraaro emphasized the need to sensitize the municipal dwellers on the dangers of flushing condoms into their toilet systems or dumping them in the sewerage plant.


He appealed to the district leaders to sensitize the masses on the proper way of condom disposal.


Biraaro also called for the implementation of the polythene bag law which banned its manufacture.


Ngora Woman MP Jacline Amongin, who is also the chairperson of Parliamentary Forum on WASH, called for more funding for water, sanitation and hygiene.


She asked the district authorities to prioritise sanitation and hygiene.


The MPs were also shown new technologies of water source and harvesting in Kalungu.


Lawmaker Hatwib Katoto warned that if the district authorities don't take action the municipality would experience an outbreak of cholera.


The Oil rich African country of Nigeria has started to borrow money to pay salaries as Interna

tional price of oil tumbles

By Agencies

Posted  Thursday, May 7  2015

 

NIGERIA, Lagos A cash shortage caused by low oil prices has forced Nigeria to borrow heavily through the early part of 2015, with the government struggling to pay public workers, officials said yesterday.

“We have serious challenges. Things have been tough since the beginning of the year and they are likely to remain so till the end of the year,” said Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala.

Nigeria, Africa’s top economy and largest oil producer, has been hammered by the 50 per cent fall in oil prices, with crude sales accounting for more than 70 per cent of government revenue.

“As it stands today, most states of the federation have not been able to pay salaries and even the federal government has not paid (April) salary and that is very worrisome,” said Imo state governor Rochas Okorocha.

Nb

It seems that Third World countries have a long way to learn how to handle their economies with a bit of caution. It is bad indeed to put ones  eggs in one basket.

THE FUTURE OF THE STATE OF BUGANDA

Posted on 16th August, 2014

   

 Professor Eric Kashambuzi

Ssabawandiisi wa 

Uganda Democratic

Federation

 

On 8 Aug 2014,

By Eric Kashambuzi <kashambuzieric@gmail.com>:

 

The First World War which many believe should not have happened began in 1914, a hundred years ago. It is being commemorated this week.Despite the suffering Uganda has gone through with wars since 1966, and the devastating evidence from wars elsewhere, there are still some Ugandans including Sejusa, Kafero, Amii Otunnu and Kuloba who are still insisting that the only way to unseat NRM regime is through another war. These people have no mandate and cannot individually or with a handful of supporters declare war on Uganda. They have formed dubious organizations to hoodwink Ugandans that they have a sizeable number of followers and therefore can declare war. We need to know what these organizations are and who runs and supports them.The devastation of World War I outlined below will hopefully change the mind of those Ugandans still preparing for an unjust war.WWI expected to last a short time in victory lasted nearly five years and ended up ripping Europe asunder and slaughtering nearly the entire generation and the brightest. Nearly everyone lost a family member or a friend.

The political, economic and social fabric was destroyed. The catastrophe was of unbelievable proportions.The Great War as it is popularly known that was fought to end all wars instead laid the foundation for yet another more devastating WWII.

Below are statistics of what happened during WWI that should persuade Ugandans not to engage yet in another war but come together and form People Power under able and patriotic leaders, not the ones we have bent on keeping the opposition divided as the upcoming meeting of opposition parties in Europe will do indirectly backing the NRM regime they are hugely benefiting from.

The precise cost of World War I will probably never be known. Here is what we know.1.     Germany lost 1, 808, 545 people while 4,247,143 were wounded;2.     France casualties have been estimated at 5,000,000 of whom 1,835,300 were dead or missing;3.     The American casualty figure stands at 325,876, of whom 115,660 lost their lives;4.     

The total losses of British Empire stood at 3,260,581, including 947,023 dead and missing. On the Western Front alone , British and Dominion casualties were 2,690,054;5.     Between half a million and two million Russians died while 3,409, 433 Russians were captured and 228,838 went missing;6.    

 Austria-Hungary lost 905,299 dead and 837,483 went missing;7.     The Spanish influenza killed some 50 million people worldwide.The information was obtained from Andrew Wiest (2014) and Peter Simkins et al., (2014).

The principal purpose of providing these figures is to illustrate especially to Ugandans that rushing into war as we are being incited by power hungry individuals could be suicidal.

Ugandans must therefore think long and hard before venturing into another war and should that happen it must be a just war.

 

Eric Kashambuzi 

 

Amin mu 1970/80 wano e Uganda, yadibaganya ebyenfuna abantu ne badda mu magendo!

By Edward Sserinnya

Added 28th October 2016

 

Amin ku kkono mu byambalo by’amagye ng’ayogera n’akakiiko akaali kagaba bizinensi ez’enjawulo.

 

OMUNTU bw’owulira abantu abalemedde e South Sudan, amasasi gye gasiiba gaseka n’okulaba abo abatikka emmaali mu Kisenyi ne ku Arua ppaaka nga balumba ng’enjogera y’ennaku zino bw’eri obatenda emitima emigumu n’okubeewuunya.

Abeewuunya aba tamanyi byafaayo by’abasuubuzi ba Uganda omuli ne Pulezidenti wa Uganda lwe yalagirako babakube amasasi n’okubatuuzaako ennyonyi nnamunkanga ne bafiira mu nnyanja kyokka abasigadde ne bagenda mu maaso n’obusuubuzi buno obw’omusaayi!

Okuva leero EDWARD SSERINNYA agenda kukutuusaako engeri abantu gye baatundanga obulamu nga batambuza amagendo era gy’anaamalira ng’akuttottoledde n’amagendo agaliwo leero. Abantu abaamira ppini olowooza batandise ku mulembe guno?

Bw’oba okirowooza bw’otyo tomanyi biki byaliwo ku mulembe gwa Idi Amin ogw ‘amagendo’ wakati wa 1973 ku 1979.

Ataagalabako oyinza okulemwa okugeraageranya obulumi abantu bwe baayitamu naye kitwalire mu mbeera y’olutalo lw’amagye agalina emmundu, ennyonyi ennwaanyi n’amaato amalwanyi nga galumba omuntu waabulijjo atalina wadde ekikongoliro!

Olwo lwe lutalo lw’Amagedo olwali wakati w’amagye ga Amin ng’agalemesa abantu okutwala ebyamaguzi n’okubiyingiza mu ggwanga olw’okubalanga okutunda ebintu ebweru ne bafiiriza gavumenti ssente ze yandiyingizza, bo abantu baabulijjo ne bazezza.

Kyokka Amin bwe yayisa ekiragiro, ky’okuttirawo awatali kubuuza oyo yenna alabibwako ng’akukusa amagendo oba okukwatibwa nago kino kyassa obulamu bw’abantu naddala abaatambuliranga ku nnyanja mu katyabaga nga bateebereza buteebereza nti otambuza magendo olwo ne bakuwereekereza amasasi.

 

Pulezidenti Idi Amin ne Major Bob Astles.

 

Amagendo kye ki?

Amagendo by’ebyamaguzi ebikukuse okuyingira oba okufuluma eggwanga. Abeenyigiranga mu busuubuzi bw’ebyamaguzi bino ebikukuse nga bayitibwa Bannamagendo nga n’omulimu gwo baguyita kukola magendo. Amagendo era gaabanga ebintu ebitakkirizibwa kutundibwa oba omuntu ng’atunda ebintu by’atakkirizibwa kutunda.

Gaatandika gatya?

Al Haji Nasser Ntege Ssebaggala, eyeerabirako n’agage ku busuubuzi bw’amagendo agamba: Amin we yatwalira obukulembeze bwa Uganda nga January 25, 1971 okuva ku mukama we Milton Obote buli kimu kyali kitambula bulungi era n’awagirwa n’amawanga okwali Bungereza, Yisirayiri n’amalala.

Yisirayiri yakola kinene okuyamba Amin naddala okumuwa ebyokulwanyisa era olwo abo be baali batendeka amagye gaffe.

Amin eyatandikira mu ky’oyinza okuyita ‘Hani muunu’ yagimalamu akaseera katono, n’atabuka n’abaali mikwano gye Abazungu nga kino ky’ava ku kugoba Bayindi.

Teyakoma awo n’Abayisirayiri n’abeefuulira oluvannyuma lw’okugoba Abayindi, olwo Gaddafi n’afuuka mukwano gwe.

Mu 1972 yalangirira kye yayita olutalo lw’ebyenfuna lwe yagamba nti lugenderera kuzza byabusuubuzi mu mikono gy’Abaddugavu era kuno kwe yasinziira okugoba Abayindi ng’ayagala Abaddugavu bafuuke bamafutamingi, bannaggagga.

Abazungu mu kunyiiga, olwo ne bateeka ku Uganda nnatti, nga zino zaakosa nnyo ebyenfuna, Uganda n’etuuka ekiseera nga tekyasuubula butereevu mu mawanga g’Abazungu, ng’amawanga ga Bulaaya gasibidde Uganda ekikookolo.

Okuva awo ebintu byatandika okwonoonekera Amin ebyenfuna bya Uganda ne biserebera ddala, olwo ebyamaguzi ng’emmwaanyi, ppamba, kooko, ekikomo n’ebirala nga Uganda tekyabitunda butereevu mu mawanga ga Bulaaya wabula ng’ebiyisa mu nsi ndala ezibigitundirayo.

Okwo kw’ogatta amawanga gano agamu okugaana okuwola Uganda.

 

John Musira omumyuka wa ssentebe wa Bugisu Cooperative Union.

 

Ekyavaako Amagendo

Sulaiman Luyimbaazi Luswa kansala w’abakadde mu munisipaali y’e Makindye azze agoberera ebyafaayo bya Uganda, wuuno annyonnyola:

Obuzibu we buva Amin kwe kugoba Abayindi mu 1972, amakolero gonna ge baali bakolamu yasalawo okugawa Bannayuganda okugaddukanya, wabula tebaalina bukugu busobola kugaddukanya.

Tosaanye kwerabira nti, mu kiseera ekyo ebintu byonna ebyali bikozesebwa mu maka nga bikolebwa wano mu makolero g’Abayindi, olw’obutaba na bukugu buddukanya makolero, ekyaddako kwali kugwa kwa makolero agasinga, olwo ebintu ebikozesebwa mu bulamu obwa bulijjo nga ssukaali, omunnyo, ssabbuuni n’ebirala ne bifuuka bya kkekkwa.

Amin yayagala okusigala ng’alaga ensi nti wadde baamusibako nnatti naye akyasobola okweyimirizaawo.

Gavumenti yagaana abantu okwegulira ebintu ebweru, olwo n’esalawo yo okukwata ebintu ng’ebitunzanga abantu kyokka ng’ebapimirako bupimizi, basobole okubikekkereza bireme kuggwaawo mangu.  

Gavumenti yalonda abantu babale mu buli kitundu nga bano be baatundanga ebikozesebwa mu maka nga ssabbuuni, omunnyo, ssukaali n’ebirala era baabitundanga buli Lwakutaano nga byakusimbira nnyiriri.

Nga bwe biggwawo nga tonnafuna ate ng’olinda Olwokutaano olujja! Abantu lwe baayozesa amapaapaali

Embeera embi ly’essomero ly’okuyiiya, n’embeera eno yayigiriza abantu ba wano okwozesa ebikoola by’amapaapaali oba okusekula ebibajjo by’omugavu n’okuba ekyovu kyabyo n’obikozesa mu kifo kya ssabbuuni, okunnyika evvu ne baliggyamu amazzi ne bagukozesa ng’omunnyo n’okusekula ebikajjo amazzi ago ne bagafumbamu caayi!

Ekyaddirira bantu kwekyawa olwo amagendo ne gatandika, abantu ne batandika okukusa ebintu nga babiyingiza wano, ate olw’okuba baali tebakkirizibwa kubitunda ne babitundiranga wansi w’ebitanda.

 

Sebaggala eyaliko Mayor we Kampala emirundi 2

 

OKUKUSA EMMWAANYI

Emmwaanyi za Uganda ezaali zissiddwaako nnatti, abantu baayiiya okuzikukusa ne bazitunda mu mawanga ag’omuliraano olwo gano ne gazitunda nga ezaago.

Ky’olina okujjukira nti mu biseera ebyo buli ggwanga lyaweebwanga obungi bw’emmwaanyi lye lirina okutunda ku katale k’ensi yonna ng’obungi bwe baliwa businziira ku bungi bw’emmwaanyi ze bakungula.

Olw’ebizibu Uganda bye yalina mu byenfuna yali erina okutunda emmwaanyi ezisinga ku mutemwa ogwagiweebwa kyokka nga kino kirina kukolebwa Gavumenti si bantu baabulijjo.

Mu katabo ka Drum akaafuluma mu 1974, mu kiseera kino Uganda yali yeesigamye ku kugula ebintu e Kenya ate nga bya buseere era nga bitundibwa mu mbeera ya ‘Gula oba oyagala, oba toyagala togula’ okugeza essaati e Kenya egula 30/-, nga mu Uganda bagitunda 105/- ate essuuti eyagulanga 80/- nga wano bagitunda 285/- enjawulo eyo mu kiseera ekyo yali nnene ddala.

Amin eyali akaziddwaako erya ‘Majegere ya Afrika’ yakyogera nga lunnye nti, kaagobye Abayindi olutalo lw’ebyenfuna alulinnyeeko n’agamba ‘Kati Abaddugavu kababukale mu bizinensi zaabwe awatali abakuba ku mukono’.

Abantu abaasinga okufuna mu mbeera eno baali bakulu mu magye n’abakungu mu gavumenti, abantu nga bafuna si lwa kukola nnyo wabula okubaako n’olujegere olubayunga ku gavumenti.

Mu nnaku eno abantu gye baayigira n’obuyiiya nti oyinza okusekula ebipapajjo by’omugavu n’oyaza engoye, ebikoola by’amapaali nabyo byoza n’ebintu ebirala Amin ku kkono mu byambalo by’amagye ng’ayogera n’akakiiko akaali kagaba bizinensi ez’enjawulo.

Pulezidenti Idi Amin ne Major Bob Astles. John Musira the amyuka ssentebe wa Bugisu Cooperative Union. olw’ebbula lya ssabuuni!

Sebaggala alaze embeera eyaliwo Hajji Nasser Ntage Ssebagala annyumya: Akalya amaggwa ke kamanya bwe kagakyusa ne Amin yatetenkanya okulaba ng’atambuza eggwanga mu mbeera enzibu bweti.

Mu kuwa bizinensi z’ Abayindi Abaddugavu, nange nafunamu kuba Amin yampa edduuka lya New Fabricano ku luguudo lwa Kampala, bino byonna byali bikyusa ebyenfuna by’eggwanga.

Amagendo agaasinga okwenyigirwamu ennyo gaali ga mmwaanyi era nga zitundibwa Kenya, era okusinga zaayitanga ku mazzi okuggyako abo abagagga ennyo abaagayisanga ku nsalo naddala eya Uganda ne Congo oba Uganda ne Rwanda.

Abaavu abaatwalanga kkiro 100 ku 500, abo nga bayisa ku nnyanja nga bakozesa amaato!

 

 uyimbaazi
Luyimbaazi

 

Naye nga bwe bakukwatako ng’eyiyo basima (entaana) kubanga Amin yali ayisizza etteeka nti akwatibwa n’amagendo attibwe buttibwa awatali kuwoza. Mu kuyisa etteeka lino, yatondawo n’ekitongole ekirwanyisa amagendo ekya Anti-Smuggling nga kikulirwa Omuzungu Lt. Maj. Bob Astles, kino kyalina amaato ku nnyanja nga kibeera kirawuna ennyanja yonna, nga kirina n’ennyonyi nnamunkanga nayo eyakozesebwanga mu kulawuna ennyanja Nalubaale.

John Musiira amyuka Ssentebe wa Bugisu Cooperative Union agamba, nti okuva mu 1976 okutuuka ku 1980 waabangayo amaka mangi agataalyanga munnyo.

Gavumenti ye yaguzanga abantu ebintu, kyokka ng’ekukomako ku bintu by’okugula si nsonga olina ssente mmeka Ssukaali nga togula kusussa kkiro bbiri, ssabbuuni nga wa bitole era bye wafunanga ng’olina okubikozesa wiiki nnamba okutuuka lwe baddamu okutunda anti baatundanga buli Lwakutaano. Kyokka jjukira byabanga bya nnyiriri era waabangawo abataafunanga!

Ebintu ebyakolanga mu bulamu obwabulijjo nga bigulibwa aba Foods and Beverages olwo ne babisaasaanya mu bantu abassibwawo okubitunda mu bitundu eby’enjawulo. Mu mbeera efaanana bw’eti amagendo mwe gaasimbira amakanda.    

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